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Nashville Flood May 2010

A devastating flood hit Nashville in early May 2010, drenching the city but uniting our community. Today, recovery efforts continue. Hundreds of citizens are rebuilding their homes and their lives, and the Metro Government is improving emergency preparedness and planning for Nashville’s long-term recovery.

Nashville Flood

The Flood by the Numbers

  • Rainfall exceeded 17 inches, the highest amount in more than 140 years of recorded history. 13 inches of rain fell in 36 hours, more than doubling the previous two-day rainfall record set in 1979.
  • The Cumberland River crested in Nashville at 51.86 feet, 12 feet above flood stage.
  • According to Metro Planning and Metro Codes, the flood resulted in an estimated $2 billion in damages to private property.
  • 11 people died as a result of the flood.
  • In the years following the flood, over 29,000 volunteers gave more than 375,000 service hours to recovery and rebuilding efforts.
  • The Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce reported 2,773 impacted businesses with 14,499 workers at the time of the flood.
  • FEMA received 20,189 Individual Assistance applications and approved 12,903, totaling more than $87 million. It also funded 768 Public Assistance projects totaling more than $53 million.

Volunteer Opportunities

If you are interested in volunteering for the continuing flood-response efforts, please contact Hands on Nashville at (615) 298-1108.

Assistance for Flood Victims

Nashville Rebuilding Assistance ProgramHousing

Nashville’s We Are Home program helps provide financial assistance beyond FEMA and SBA to help repair housing damaged by the May 2010 floods, administered by The Housing Fund. To apply for the program or to speak with a housing coach, call The Housing Fund at 615-780-7000.

We Are Home offers the following programs:

  • Homeowner Repair: Grants and loans are available to assist owner- occupants in repairing their flood damaged homes.
  • Rental Repair Program: Grants and loans are available for owners of 1 to 4 rental units to pay for repairs to properties affected by the flood.
  • Downpayment Assistance: Loans are available to help residents who relocated due to the degree of flood damage to their homes. Examples include homeowners who accepted a buyout offer from Metro Water Services or cases where the cost to elevate and rebuild was prohibitive.
  • Full Reconstruction: Grants and loans are available to assist owners of extensively damaged houses in or near a flood plain that are not included in the buyouts and must rebuild their homes to meet current elevation standards.
  • Purchase and Rebuild: This program provides loans for land acquisition and repairs that will help stabilize flood-affected neighborhoods.
Homeowners making repairs to a flood-damaged structure need to get a building permit. More information about the permitting process, including help finding a licensed contractor, can be found online at the Department of Codes and Building Safety or by calling the Codes Department at (615) 862-6500.

2-1-1 Get help. Give help.Other Needs

Flood victims in need of assistance not related to housing should call 211, Nashville’s community services help line.

Ensuring a Safer Nashville

Mayor Karl Dean created the Unified Flood Preparedness Plan, a collaborative effort to identify and evaluate flood-damage-reduction measures on the Cumberland River and its five major tributaries: the Harpeth River, Whites Creek, Browns Creek, Mill Creek and Richland Creek.

United flood preparedness planPublic involvement plays a key role in the UFPP, which involves three phases of community meetings. The first phase, which took place in July 2011, offered an opportunity for the public to hear about the project and provide initial input and ideas. In the second phase, which was held in February 2012, the UFPP team presented a progress update to attendees. The third phase of meetings, to be held in the summer of 2012, will include a presentation of the final draft of the proposed plan for comment.

Remembering the Flood

The Nashville Flood Anniversary Exhibit is now on display at the Nashville Public Library. You can view the exhibit in the Nashville Room on the second floor of the downtown Main library. The exhibit will be displayed at the library until the end of the 2012.

Photos of the May 2010 flood are also available

Public Notice

Request for Public Comment

Amendment Three to the Nashville-Davidson County

Community Development Block Grant Disaster Recovery Action Plan

Public Notice

Amendment Three

Photo Gallery

May 2010 Nashville Flood Photos

A devastating flood hit Nashville in early May 2010, drenching the city but uniting our community. Today, recovery efforts continue. Hundreds of citizens are rebuilding their homes and their lives, and the Metro Government is improving emergency preparedness and planning for Nashville’s long-term recovery.
Nashville Flood May 2010